Johnny Bierfeldt's 1932 Ford

From Kustomrama
Jump to: navigation, search
As Johnny's Roadster appeared in Rod & Custom March 1954. It was channeled 7 inches over the frame. Photo by Don Hudson.
Note the front bumper made of a 1949-1950 Ford grille component, bolted directly to the frame horns. Photo by Don Hudson.
The black and grey upholstery was made by fellow Long Beach Qualifiers member Don Hudson. Photo by Don Hudson.
A 247cui 1940 Ford block was used. Photo by Don Hudson.
A 2 1/2" dropped axle was installed, brakes were from a 1946 Ford, and the front fenders were made from 1936 Ford spare tire covers. Photo by Don Hudson.

1932 Ford Roadster built by Long Beach Qualifiers member Johnny Bierfeldt of Norwalk, California. John began with a smooth and sound roadster body, so body work was necessary only where changes were desired, such as filling the cowl vent and the outside door-handle holes. All the unnecessary holes in the frame were filled as well. The body was channeled 7 inches, making it sit low and hiding the frame rails. He filled the dash in solid, and chromed it. There were only a minimum of instruments on the panel, along with a hand fuel pressure pump. Up front, a 2 1/2" dropped axle was installed. The rear end was from a 1941 Ford with 3.78 gears. Tube shocks were used at all four corners for better handling. Due to the channeling, he had to shorten the pedal assembly 4 inches. Juice brakes from a 1946 Ford were installed, along with 1932 Ford spindles. 16" solid rims were taken from a 1940 Ford, sporting 5.00-16 ribbed racing doughnuts up front, and 7.00-16 ground grabbers behind. The rear wheels were offset for better tire to body clearance. The front fenders were made from a 1936 Ford spare tire cover, and the wider rear units were from a Buick. The front bumper was a 1949-1950 Ford grille component, bolted directly to the frame horns. The rear bar was made of 5/8" bar stock, and chromed. The taillights were from a 1939 Ford. The grille shell was filled, and the pressure cap was mounted on the back side of the top tank. The grille shell was moved forward and lowered between the frame rails as well, and a new aluminum 3 piece hood was made in 3 sections, louvered and fit with trunk latches to hold it down. The gas tank was relocated inside the trunk.[1]


A 247cui 1940 Ford block was used, hogged out to 3 3/16". The crank was a Mercury with a 1/8" stroke, and the block was ported and relieved. In the end, the engine was dynamically balanced. It had a Super T Harman & Collins cam, three chromed carbs on a Evans manifold, fed by an electric fuel pump. It had Edelbrock heads, which gave a compression ratio of 9 to 1. A Spaulding ignition provided the spark. The exhaust was able to breath freely through a set of Clark headers. The Roadster sported a Schiefer aluminum flywheel, and a 1934 Ford transmission fit with 26 tooth Lincoln gear system.[1]


The interior was stitched by fellow Qualifier member Don Hudson of Don’s Trim Shop. He did a clean scheme consisting of black and grey. Another club member, Bart Root finished the body off in a glistening black paint job, with red wheels to add a little contrast. The roadster weighed 2300 lbs.[1]


Magazine Features and Appearances

Rod & Custom March 1954


References





Calling all Early Customs for Customs by the Sea, a pre-1952 custom car show presented by Kustomrama and the Race of Gentlemen. Pre-Registered Cars Only. Register Here.

Promote your shop, show or business on Kustomrama - This ad space can also be bought to promote cars for sale or to hunt down rare parts you're looking for. Click here for more info...

 

Did You Enjoy This Article?

Kustomrama is an online encyclopedia dedicated to traditional hot rod and custom cars. Our mission is to protect, preserve and share traditional hot rod custom car history from all over the world.




Help Us Make This Article Better

If you have additional information, photos, feedback or corrections about Johnny Bierfeldt's 1932 Ford, please get in touch with Kustomrama at: mail@kustomrama.com.


Personal tools
Please Help Kustomrama
facebook
Recommended reading